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Podcast: Episode 55 – Edmund Harriss, Tilings, motivations and Street Maths

These are the show notes for episode 55 of the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast. 55 is the largest triangular number in the Fibonacci sequence. More about 55 from Number Gossip.

This week on the podcast I spoke to Edmund Harriss of the University of Leicester, who speaks about his research area of tiling patterns and how this leads him into maths outreach.

Edmund contributes to a Tilings Encyclopedia. You can read about medieval Islamic tilings in New Scientist. There is a gallery of Escher tilings at Mathematical Imagery. You can find out more about Escher on the M.C. Escher website, or by reading the Escher biography at the MacTutor History of Mathematics archive. You can read about Penrose tilings in the Tilings Encyclopedia and read a biography of Penrose at MacTutor.

Edmund’s Royal Society exhibition has a website: “How do shapes fill space?” You can find out more about Street Maths by viewing Edmund’s slides “Street Maths“. You can read Marcus du Sautoy on motivating interest in mathematics in the Guardian article “The secret life of numbers“. Edmund mentions a meeting he ran at Leicester, “Talking to teachers“.

I recommend Edmund’s blog Maxwell’s Demon, and following Edmund on Twitter as @Gelada.

You can find out more about the IMA by visiting http://www.ima.org.uk/student/. You can find out more about what I do by reading this blog, by following me on Twitter or visiting peterrowlett.net. Join the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast Facebook Fan Page.

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  • Peter Rowlett teaches mathematics at university. His views do not represent those of his employer. His column at The Aperiodical is Travels in a Mathematical World.

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