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The New Mathblogging.org

A couple of weeks ago, our chums slash competitors1 at mathblogging.org relaunched their website. They’re now using the much fancier ScienceSeeker.org software and it looks really good.

The aim of mathblogging.org is to collect together all the mathematical blogging that happens on the internet and present it in a way that makes it easy to discover great stuff. I personally found the old site pretty hard to use, which I think Peter, Sam and Frederik realised, but the new way of doing things is much more user-friendly. The main interface presents absolutely every post on every blog they’re tracking, and then you can filter by topic and get feeds based on just the terms you’re interested in.

Peter Krautzberger, one of the three dudes in charge of the site, has been very complimentary about this site in the past, so I think it’s my turn to say that mathblogging.org is a fantastic resource, and I don’t envy them the task they’ve given themselves. As an entirely volunteer effort, it’s magnificent.

A really good idea they had, to combat the burn-out from reading so many blogs, was to recruit three extra editors who pick out some favourite posts from the stream each day. The old mathblogging had a “weekly picks” blog, which eventually became more like a monthly picks blog, but I think this continuous stream of quality links is much easier to keep up with.

If you blog about maths of any sort, make sure to add yourself to the database so your posts get read. The process of adding sites is much easier than it used to be: you just need to give them your site’s address and they’ll take care of the rest.

Finally, there are a few Twitter accounts you can keep up with: Editors’ Picks, Editors’ Notes, and absolutely all the posts (only for the brave).

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Welcome to the new mathblogging.org!

mathblogging.org

  1. Not really, they’re just chums. []

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