You're reading: Posts By Colin Beveridge

The Chris Tarrant Problem

This is a puzzle I presented at the MathsJam conference. It’s a problem that gave me a headache for a week or so, and I thought others might enjoy it, too. I do know the answer, but I’m not going to give it away — you can tweet me @icecolbeveridge if you want to discuss your theories! (As Colin Wright says: don’t tell people the answer).

You’ve heard of the Monty Hall Problem, right?

Review: Wuzzit Trouble

Wuzzit Trouble screenshot

Only you can save the Wuzzit! Screenshot courtesy of Innertube Games.

Had Wuzzit Trouble been around in 2001, when I was teaching Diophantine equations… well, there wouldn’t have been an iPhone to play it on, and it would probably have been too graphically-intensive for the computers available at the time. However, I’m willing to bet fewer of my students would have fallen asleep in class.

Axes to Axes

In which the intrepid maths-crime-fighting duo of Gale and Beveridge find themselves thrust back to a time before people could do maths properly.


It had been a quiet night at the Aperiodical police station. Apart from a few cases of broken scheduling in Excel formulas – nothing a bit of TIME() in the cells wouldn’t put right – there was nothing.

At 11pm, the phone rang. I looked at Sergeant Gale. Sergeant Gale pointedly looked at the phone, raised an eyebrow, and returned to his sudoku.

“Maths Police, bad graphs department. Constable Beveridge speaking, how can I help?”

George E. P. Box (1919-2013)

March was a terribly sad month for the University of Wisconsin; just days after losing Mary Ellen Rudin, George E. P. Box also passed away. He was 93.

Mary Ellen Rudin (1924-2013)

Mary Ellen Rudin, one of the pioneers of set-theoretical topology, passed away this week. She was 88.

Matheliebe exhibition in Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein is a tiny, mountain-top country with the population of a medium-sized town and a football team routinely thrashed by everyone who encounters them (except for Scotland, of course). You’d be forgiven for thinking little ever happened there.

But you’d be wrong! There is maths in Liechtenstein! The National Museum in Vaduz (page in German) is hosting a pretty awesome-looking exhibition called MatheLiebe.

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