You're reading: Videos

Recreational Maths Seminar – Seven Staggering Sequences

Yesterday I hosted another recreational maths seminar on Google+. I had a lot of fun! We discussed the paper, Seven Staggering Sequences (PDF), by Neil Sloane. In the paper Sloane, the man behind the fantastic Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences, described seven of the sequences he found most especially interesting.

The Hangout was just under an hour and a half long, and we managed to get through five of the seven sequences. Some of them are really hard to understand!

[youtube url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBvyaku9Omw]

Recreational Maths Seminar – Picture-hanging puzzles

I hosted the first (proper) Aperiodical recreational maths seminar yesterday. We discussed the paper Picture-hanging puzzles, by Demaine et al. Click through to watch the YouTube recording of the session.

A recreational maths seminar?

Would you be interested in taking part in a sort of online video-chat seminar about recreational maths? Then read on!

The Calculus of Love, a short film

 

The Calculus of Love is a short film by writer/director Dan Clifton and starring Keith Allen. The film’s distributor got in touch with us last week to direct our attention toward the film, with the following synopsis:

Mathematics Professor AG Bowers is obsessed with solving the fabled 250 year old Goldbach Conjecture. When a series of mystery letters arrive hinting at a solution, Bowers believes his lifelong dream may at last be within reach.

After being shown at various film festivals, the film is now available to view online. I’ve embedded it below the fold, along with an interview with the film’s director, Dan Clifton.

Cardboard SKI calculus

I had a spare day yesterday so, rather than clean my house, I made a model of the SKI combinator calculus out of a pizza box.

[youtube url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fZQMmgElRMI]

Rubik’s Tube

James Grime, cubing hard

Numberphile filmmaker and general internet legend Brady Haran has been busy putting together a series of YouTube videos about the Rubik’s cube, with contributions from Aperiodical friends Matt Parker and James Grime. The videos also feature lots of solving clips sent in by viewers, and Aperiodical Editor triumvir and sometime maths-talker-abouter Katie Steckles (that’s me) occasionally pops in to make comments and state facts which are no longer true (a world record was broken 4 days after filming).

Google+