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Patterns and code to make your own cellular automaton scarves now online

If you remember our post about Fabienne Serrière’s amazing Cellular Automaton Scarves Kickstarter back in 2015, you’ll be pleased to hear Fabienne has now put the patterns, and all the code you need to make your own scarves, online on her Ravelry page.

If you have a knitting machine and are prepared to hack it to take code input (you can read Fabienne’s blog to find out how she’s done that), you can use JPG files to generate knitting patterns of your own, or use Fabienne’s code to create cellular automata from a seed row of pixels of your choice. She’s included the code for Rule 110, but I’m sure you could work out your own automata and knit those too. The patterns can also be knitted by hand, if you’re incredibly patient.

via KnitYak on Twitter.

Mathematical Scarves Kickstarter

If you like your accessories ‘provably unique’, check out this mathematically interesting Kickstarter project – KnitYak, aka Fabienne Serriere, is going to generate some knitting patterns for scarves algorithmically, so no two scarves will be the same. They’ve hacked a knitting machine to use cellular automata to generate unique black-and-white patterns, which will be knitted in merino wool using a Jacquard (double) knit, resulting in lovely well-finished pieces by the sound of things (although the scarves start from $150, so you’d expect something pretty nice).

Check out the video below, and consider chucking some money on the KnitYak Kickstarter page.

Rock Paper Squiggles

We’ve seen non-transitive dice, and we’ve had cellular automata coming out of our ears (and proceeding deterministically). Now, this:

[youtube url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4cV0nCIZoc]

A post by the CA’s creator describes in more detail what’s going on, although essentially the idea is that red, green and blue are able to destroy each other in a similar way to rock-paper-scissors, and the result of letting them play for a while is quite interesting. My favourite YouTube comment here has got to be the amazing and prescient “I’m high and what is this?”