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Education Round Up

Hello. I’m Colin Beveridge and I’m stealing Christian’s round-up introduction, since we’ve had a handful of links of teaching and learning sent our way. Let’s get this show on the road!

Travelling Salesman Movie UK screening in Cambridge

Plus Magazine tweeted to say that they’re showing the Travelling Salesman Movie chez eux in November. Tickets £7.50, 6.30pm on the 20th of November.

I thought we’d posted about the movie before but a search of the archives turned up nothing, so here’s the trailer:

[youtube url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ybd5rbQ5rU]

If that looks like your cup of tea (or N-tea), you can book tickets at the University of Cambridge online store.

More information

Buy tickets

Travelling Salesman Movie official site

‘Travelling Salesman’, Tuesday 20 November 2012 at Plus Magazine

Maths and Paralympic Sport in Plus magazine

Apparently there’s a parallel Olympics taking place in series with the Olympics in London.

Having done such an excellent job so far this summer, the Millennium Mathematics Project is continuing its coverage from a mathematical angle, with the Plus Paralympic calendar and the special project Maths and Sport: Countdown to the Games. For example, John Barrow discovers when investigating the different speeds of races over different distances that wheelchair racing is “not just a wheel-based equivalent of Olympic racing” but is quite a different kettle of fish.

In what flipping dimension is a square peg in a round hole just as good as a round peg in a square hole?

In what flipping dimension is a square peg in a round hole just as good as a round peg in a square hole?

Let’s start at the beginning.

My Plus magazine puzzle from March asks “Which gives a tighter fit: a square peg in a round hole or a round peg in a square hole?” By “tighter” we mean that a higher proportion of the hole is occupied by the peg.

New Careers section on Plus Magazine

Plus Magazine have launched a new careers section. Aimed at teachers, students, career advisors and parents, the section offers a glimpse of where maths can take you. For a long time these have been the best sources of careers advice for mathematics in the UK so a collaboration should be very fruitful.

This gives information on the wide range of careers that use mathematics – from avalanche research and planning the Olympics to designing computer games or saving lives in developing countries – containing career profiles and in-depth career interviews, as well as advice from employers and information on how to enter a career with maths.

The new careers section is a collaboration between Plus and the MathsCareers website, which was developed by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications, the London Mathematical Society and the Royal Statistical Society.