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Podcast Finale/Trailer

The Travels in a Mathematical World podcast has ended because I am moving on to another job. Because of this, I have put together a brief finale episode. This includes a series of clips from a wide range of the episodes. I hope the clips will show the podcast to be interesting and varied, covering topics that are at times poignant and important; at others just a bit of fun. The idea is that people tend to download the most recent episode of a podcast they have newly found and this hopes to encourage them to download the rest. Perhaps it will also be useful as a sort of ‘trailer’ for the podcast.

There are 64 episodes of the podcast available through www.travelsinamathematicalworld.co.uk. Make sure you download the full set of 64 episodes! And tell your friends! You can find out what I’m now doing in podcasting via peterrowlett.net/podcasts.

Podcast: Episode 64 – Peter McOwan, his career

These are the show notes for episode 64 of the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast. 64 is the number of squares on a chessboard. More about 64 from Number Gossip.

Peter McOwan of Queen Mary, University of London, spoke to me about his career, particularly how mathematics helped him work in mathematical physics, medical imaging, computer-generated holography, optical neural networks, psychology, cybernetics, mathematical modelling of the biological brain, optical illusions, magic tricks, computer vision, teaching and outreach!

Peter spoke about the Living with Robots and Interactive Companions (LIREC) project. Find out about The Magic of Computer Science from Computer Science for Fun. Peter is co-author of The Manual of Mathematical Magic.

You can find out more about the IMA by visiting http://www.ima.org.uk/student/. You can find out more about what I do by reading this blog, by following me on Twitter or visiting peterrowlett.net. Join the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast Facebook Fan Page.

Podcast: Episode 63 – Rhys Phillips, Electrostatic hazards in aircraft

These are the show notes for episode 63 of the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast. 63 is the smallest number out of two (the other being 69) such that the common alphabetical value of its Roman representation is equal to itself (LXIII – 12+24+9+9+9 = 63). More about 63 from Number Gossip.

This time on the podcast, we hear from Rhys Phillips of the Lightning Direct Effects Group, European Aeronautic Defence & Space Company (EADS), who told me about his work as a research engineer around electrostatic hazards in aircraft.

You can find out more about EADS on their website. You can read a profile of Rhys Phillips on the Maths Careers website.

You can find out more about the IMA by visiting http://www.ima.org.uk/student/. You can find out more about what I do by reading this blog, by following me on Twitter or visiting peterrowlett.net. Join the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast Facebook Fan Page.

Podcast: Episode 62 – William Simpson, Solar physics

These are the show notes for episode 62 of the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast. 62 is the smallest inconsummate number in base 10: no number is a 62-multiple of the sum of its digits. More about 62 from Number Gossip.

William Simpson of the University of St. Andrews talks about his work in solar stresses and solar flares, his theological motivations for studying mathematics and physics and the opportunities for study abroad under the American National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program. I spoke to William at the IMA Tomorrow’s Mathematicians Today undergraduate conference at Greenwich.

You can find out more about the IMA by visiting http://www.ima.org.uk/student/. You can find out more about what I do by reading this blog, by following me on Twitter or visiting peterrowlett.net. Join the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast Facebook Fan Page.

Podcast: Episode 61 – Chris Marchant, Outreach

These are the show notes for episode 61 of the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast. 61 is prime, the smallest prime whose reversal is a square. More about 61 from Number Gossip.

This week on the podcast we hear from Chris Marchant, Outreach Manager for The Department Of Mathematical Sciences, The University of Liverpool. Chris tells us about the department’s work in outreach activities.

You can find out all about the Liverpool Mathematics Society (LMS) on its website. You can read an article about the Fun Maths Roadshow on the teachernet Secondary Teachers magazine website as “Figuring it out“.

You can find out more about the IMA by visiting http://www.ima.org.uk/student/. You can find out more about what I do by reading this blog, by following me on Twitter or visiting peterrowlett.net. Join the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast Facebook Fan Page.

Podcast: Episode 60 – Sarah Norton, systems engineering

These are the show notes for episode 60 of the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast. 60 is the base of the Babylonian and earlier numeral systems. You can read some history of this system, how it worked and a discussion of possible reasons for 60 being the base at the MacTutor History of Mathematics Archive page on Babylonian numerals.

Sarah Norton of European Aeronautic Defence & Space Company (EADS) talks about how her mathematics degree helps her in her work in systems engineering and a specific application she is working on in creating a system for fire engines responding to mobile phone emergency calls.

You can find out more about the IMA by visiting http://www.ima.org.uk/student/. You can find out more about what I do by reading this blog, by following me on Twitter or visiting peterrowlett.net. Join the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast Facebook Fan Page.

Podcast: Episode 59 – Katie Steckles and Rufus Roberts, Maths busking

These are the show notes for episode 59 of the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast. 59 is prime, the center prime number in a 3×3 prime magic square that has the smallest possible magic constant 177. More about 59 from Number Gossip.

At Outreach in Collaboration III at the Centre for Effective Learning in Science at Nottingham Trent University, Katie Steckles and Rufus Roberts talk to me about the phenomenon of ‘maths busking’. Find out more at mathsbusking.com.

You can find out more about the IMA by visiting http://www.ima.org.uk/student/. You can find out more about what I do by reading this blog, by following me on Twitter or visiting peterrowlett.net. Join the Travels in a Mathematical World Podcast Facebook Fan Page.