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I bought


I’m a big fan of novelty domain names: I once bought just so that could be my corresponding address when I submitted a paper. That domain has expired, but my love for one-shot novelty purchases has not!

To celebrate π day this year, I decided that it should be possible to type a little bit of π into the internet and be given the rest of it. You can have dots in domain names, so a domain like “” is possible. I only know π to two decimal places off the top of my head, so I was dismayed to learn that is being squatted.

After a bit of googling to find more digits of π (hey, this website will be really useful once I set it up!), I found the first decimal approximation which hasn’t already been registered:

Try going there now. It really exists!

I’ve set it up so you get an endlessly scrolling list of decimal digits of π, generated using my favourite unbounded spigot algorithm. I suppose you can consider this my entry in our π approximation challenge.

A good π day’s work.

3 Responses to “I bought”

  1. Alex Fink

    Editing error report: when Vega computed 136 digits, surely the year wasn’t also 136.

    And if you’re open to accepting other entries in that list besides historical computations, how about the Feynman point?

    • Christian Perfect

      Well spotted! Fixed.

      I’ve added the Feynman point, and also the maximally-accurate observable π celebration as well as the accuracy required to calculate the “circumference” of the observable universe to one Planck length.


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