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Review: Math Without Numbers by Milo Beckman

This guest review is written by Sophie Maclean. Math Without Numbers will be released on 7th January.

Math Without Numbers

I think it’s safe to say that all fans of The Aperiodical like maths. I would also be confident in saying that there’s a shared feeling of “the more the merrier”, and we want as many people as possible to share our love of maths. In this respect, Milo Beckman would fit right in. In fact, I’d go as far as to say that his book Math Without Numbers is precisely the kind of book that could get more people to realise how fun maths can be.

James Grime answers your Shakuntala Devi questions

This is a follow-up to James’s FAQ for the 2014 film The Imitation Game.

Shakuntala Devi is a 2020 Indian Hindi-language film about Shakuntala Devi, a performer of impressive mental calculations, available now on Amazon Prime.

Alex Bellos – The Language Lover’s Puzzle Book

The Language Lover's Puzzle Book - front cover image

If you’re a fan of maths (which we assume you are, if you’re reading a maths blog), you might be familiar with Alex Bellos from his excellent popular maths books, including Alex’s Adventures in Numberland and the follow-up Alex Through The Looking Glass; you might also enjoy his more recent forays into puzzle books, including Can You Solve My Problems, and Japanese logic puzzle collection Puzzle Ninja, as well as his regular Monday puzzle column in The Guardian.

For his latest book, The Language Lover’s Puzzle Book, Alex has focused on language puzzles, largely drawn from the linguistic equivalent of Maths Olympiads (which he’s gotten really into lately). It’s a hefty volume split into cleverly collected sections on different aspects of language – including how languages are constructed, how words are pronounced, and as you might expect, the origins of how language is used to communicate numbers.

Review: Why Study Mathematics, by Vicky Neale

Vicky Neale on Twitter: "My new book "Why Study Mathematics?" is published  today! It's designed for students considering a maths degree, and their  teachers and families. @LPPbooks and I would love it

In fact, St Andrews offered a French for Scientists course, so I ended up doing Maths with French. A win all round.

I can pinpoint the exact moment it became clear I would study maths at university. Parents’ evening, year 12, I mentioned to my French teacher that I was thinking about a French degree. He looked at me as if I was stupid and said something like “you’re good at French, but you’re GOOD at maths. Besides, a French degree isn’t much use.” Alright, fine. Maths it is. He was spot-on. I never looked back.

Review: Immersive Linear Algebra

We invited guest author, Big Math-Off contestant and recent maths graduate Brad Ashley to review Immersive Math’s linear algebra textbook – a new take on the format.

Immersive Linear Algebra is an online interactive linear algebra textbook, created by mathematicians and computer scientists Jacob Ström, Kalle Åström, and Tomas Akenine-Möller. With their impressive collective knowledge of the field, and its applications within computer graphics, they seek to improve upon the idea of a textbook with the use of interactive diagrams.

Colourful Mathematics – A Review of Alex Berke’s Book ‘Beautiful Symmetries’

Title page of "Beautiful Symmetry, A Coloring Book About Math"

Group theory is a strange and wonderful area of study in mathematics, with plenty of key ideas and core concepts for one to wrap their algebra-hungry head around. But how do you introduce these algebraic constructs to beginners in a fun and engaging manner, whilst simultaneously providing a thoughtful read for the experts? This is exactly what mathematician and computer scientist Alex Berke accomplishes with her mathematical colouring book Beautiful Symmetry and its innovative group colouring concept.

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