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nimsticks: LaTeX package for drawing Nim sticks and games

A while ago on this blog I shared a LaTeX macro I had written for drawing games of Nim. I have now taken the plunge and written this into a LaTeX package called nimsticks. (Why? What do you do to relax on a lazy Sunday morning?)

Here is the description of the nimsticks package:

This LaTeX package provides commands \drawnimstick to draw a single nim stick and \nimgame which represents games of multi-pile Nim. Nim sticks are drawn with a little random wobble so they look ‘thrown together’ and not too regular.

What this does it allows commands such as \nimgame{5,3,4} which renders like this:

Three Nim heaps: 5 sticks, 3 sticks and 4 sticks

Mathematical Objects: Mandala with Hana Ayoob

Mathematical Objects

A conversation about mathematics inspired by a mandala. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett, with special guest Hana Ayoob.

Mandala patterned circle with an anatomical heart at the centre
Mandala by Hana Ayoob
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Mathematical Objects: Acoustic mirrors with James Grime

Mathematical Objects

A conversation about mathematics inspired by acoustic mirrors. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett, with special guest James Grime.

WW1 Acoustic Mirror, Kilnsea, by Paul Glazzard
Image: WW1 Acoustic Mirror, Kilnsea; cc-by-sa/2.0 – © Paul Glazzard.

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Prime Climb colouring in with LuaTeX

A while ago, my son did the Prime Climb colouring sheet.

Mathematical Objects: Number block cubes

Mathematical Objects

A conversation about mathematics inspired by number block cubes/snap cubes. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett.

Number block cubes

Peter’s blog post: Mathematical play with young children.

Mike Lawler’s three-tweet thread of more advanced ideas starts here:

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Mathematical Objects: Rubik’s Cube

Mathematical Objects

A conversation about mathematics inspired by a Rubik’s Cube. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett.

Rubik's cube
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