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Mathematical Objects: Noughts and Crosses (Tic Tac Toe) board

Mathematical Objects

A conversation about mathematics inspired by a Noughts and Crosses (Tic Tac Toe) board, covering Noughts and Crosses, a surprising number of variants, with a bit of higher dimensions and topology for good measure. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett.

Noughts and Crosses board
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Particularly mathematical Birthday Honours 2019

With the announcement the Queen’s Birthday Honours list, it’s time for the latest in our ongoing Honours-watch series of posts. In this, we search arbitrarily for a few maths-related terms in the list, and hope our well-informed readers fill in the blanks where actual knowledge is required.

  • Sir Peter Donnelly, Chief Executive, Genomics plc and Professor of Statistical Science, University of Oxford. Knighted for services to the Understanding of Human Genetics in Disease.
  • Ken Brown, Professor of Mathematics, University of Glasgow. Appointed CBE for services to the Mathematical Sciences.
  • Sylvia Richardson, Director, Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit, University of Cambridge. Appointed CBE for services to Medical Statistics.
  • Max Parmar, Professor of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology and Director, MRC Clinical Trials Unit, University College London. Appointed OBE for services to Medical Research and Clinical Trials.
  • Arnold Black, Historian and Statistician, Scottish Athletics. Appointed MBE for services to Athletics.
  • Elizabeth Buttigieg, Executive Officer, UK Statistics Authority. Appointed MBE services to Pensioners, Veterans and the community in Newport, Wales.
  • Duncan Lawson, Co-Director sigma, Coventry University. Appointed MBE for services to Mathematics in Higher Education.
  • Peter Ransom. Appointed MBE for voluntary service to Mathematics Education.
  • Lauren Shea. Awarded BEM for services to Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics to Young People.
  • Jess Wade, Research Physicist, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London. Awarded BEM for services to Gender Diversity in Science.

Are there any others we’ve missed? Please add any of interest in the comments below. A full list may be obtained from the UK Government website.

Creating the universe: an interactive mathematical art project

Creating the universe

Creating the universe‘ is an “interactive mathematical art project” by Kathrin Glau taking place at Tate Modern London from 11-16 June 2019. Its website explains:

With top and felt we explore a conceptual world that normally is layed out in its own symbolic language. This is an artistic study of the foundations of mathematics. To do so, we create the nested sets building the mathematical universe itself.

Kathrin Glau

A page on the website offers more detail about the exhibition. It is part of a wider Queen Mary University programme of activity at the Tate, with free entry.

Mathematical Objects: Tangerine

Mathematical Objects

A conversation about mathematics inspired by a tangerine (no, really!). Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett.

tangerine
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View D-Day via real-time tweets of Enigma intercepts from Bletchley Park

Bletchley Park are planning to real-time tweet the D-Day landings on their 75th anniversary, via decrypted German Naval Enigma messages intercepted on site.

The Bletchley Park website explains:

To coincide with the 75th anniversary of D-Day, this Thursday 6 June 2019, Bletchley Park will be live tweeting minute by minute, in real time 75 years to the day, decrypted German Naval Enigma messages intercepted on site during the 6 June 1944 operation.

Starting from 23.58 GMT on 5 June, when German naval units were put on alert, to the following night by which time 156,000 Allied troops had landed by sea and air, the messages reveal how the Germans slowly realised that the Allied invasion in the West had begun. The Western Allies had landed in Normandy and not Calais as the Germans had been led to believe.

The 182 messages will be posted on the Bletchley Park twitter account @bletchleypark starting at 00.58 (GMT+1) and ending at 23.38 (GMT+1) – the times they would have originally been intercepted on 6 June 1944.

Update: If you are following the messages, it may be useful to know that Bletchley has produced a glossary of terms used.

Mathematical Objects: Pile of matchsticks

Mathematical Objects

A conversation about mathematics inspired by a pile of matchsticks. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett.

Pile of matchsticks
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