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Mathematical Objects: Tangerine

Mathematical Objects

A conversation about mathematics inspired by a tangerine (no, really!). Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett.

tangerine
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Mathematical Objects: Pile of matchsticks

Mathematical Objects

A conversation about mathematics inspired by a pile of matchsticks. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett.

Pile of matchsticks
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Mathematical Objects: Tantrix Tiles, Beaded Necklaces and Juggling Balls

Mathematical Objects

A conversation about mathematics inspired by a set of Tantrix tiles, a beaded necklace and some juggling balls. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett, with special guest Alex Corner.

Juggling balls, beads and tiles
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Carnival of Mathematics 169

The next issue of the Carnival of Mathematics, rounding up blog posts from the month of March, is now online at Gereshes.

The Carnival rounds up maths blog posts from all over the internet, including some from our own Aperiodical. See our Carnival of Mathematics page for more information.

Mathematical Objects: Stick of Chalk

Mathematical Objects

A conversation about mathematics inspired by a stick of chalk. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett.

A stick of chalk
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New Fellows of the Royal Society announced

The 2019 list of Fellows of the Royal Society has now been announced, and that means it’s time for us to spend a couple of minutes looking up which of them work in mathematics, the boss of sciences.

The new Fellows, who join a hugely prestigious list of great scientific thinkers (and Elon Musk), are being recognised for their “substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowledge, including mathematics, engineering science and medical science”. The FRS has been described by The Guardian as “the equivalent of a lifetime achievement Oscar”.

This year’s intake includes three Fields medalists – Caucher Birkar (Cambridge) and Ashkay Venkatesh (Princeton) from 2018, and Manjul Bhargava (IAS) from 2014 – as well as Christopher Hacon (University of Utah), Peter Haynes (Cambridge), Roy Kerr (Christchurch, NZ), Jack Dongarra (Tennessee/Manchester), all working in mathematics or applied maths. There’s also medical statisticians Sarah C. Darby (Oxford) and Robert Tibshirani (Stanford), as well as six physicists and three computer scientists.

Read the full list:Royal Society announces 2019 Fellows

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