You're reading: Posts By Katie Steckles

Peter Rowlett interviewed on mathblogging.org

Having featured interviews with two of our three editors in the past (see: Christian P here and Katie here), the lovely people at mathblogging.org have now completed the set and this week feature an interview with “the Bill Bryson of mathematics” (source: overheard at the Maths Jam conference), our own Peter Rowlett.

Why and when did Peter start blogging? Does anything still exist in maths he hasn’t yet blogged about? Find out in ‘Mathematical Instruments: Travels in a Mathematical World‘.

Carnival of Mathematics 93

The next issue of the Carnival of Mathematics, rounding up blog posts from the month of November, is now online at X in Vogue.

The Carnival rounds up maths blog posts from all over the internet, including some from our own Aperiodical. For more information about the Carnival of Mathematics, click here.

New York Museum of Mathematics opening weekend tickets now on sale

UK-based fans of the proposed UK Maths Museum will be exceedingly jealous to hear that New York’s mathematical visitor attraction, MoMath (the National Museum of Mathematics), is opening this month. Their opening weekend is 15th-16th December, and tickets are now on sale if you want to attend either day to take in their exhibits and activities.

For a taster of what the museum will be like, Time Out has a slide show of exciting pictures alongside a review.

For more information about the museum, visit their website at momath.org, or follow them on Twitter @MoMath1.

Watch Tim Harford recording a new radio show about economics for the BBC

Fans of Tim Harford and his work on BBC Radio 4’s More or Less will be excited to learn he’s doing a new radio show about economics. In this post on his blog, he explains the show will be called ‘Pop Up Economics’, and consist of short stories about important people and ideas in economics.

The show is being recorded in the evening this coming Tuesday 4th December, in London, and if you’d like to go along, you can email popupeconomics@bbc.co.uk for tickets and details.

Via @TimHarford on Twitter.

Tying knots in light

According to this post on phys.org, which reports on this paper in science journal Nature, there’s some beautiful physics which results from tying knots in light. It opens, “New research published today seeks to push the discovery that light can be tied in knots to the next level.” Between us, I wasn’t actually aware of the discovery that light can be tied in knots (and I’ve done a fair amount of knot theory, and observed a decent quantity of light) – but apparently it’s something scientists have been exploring for years.

A spinning optical soliton (wave pulse) can spontaneously create knotted and linked structures, as the soliton curves around in space, and while previously it’s been observed after engineering them to happen, now the knots are forming spontaneously, like ” those annoying knots that you always get in electrical cables.” (see: here). The paper suggests similar behaviour might be seen in other types of wavefronts, such as superfluids and trapped matter waves. For anyone who got lost around ‘soliton’, rest assured it involves the use of lasers. Obviously.

More information

Beautiful physics: tying knots in light on phys.org.

Spontaneous knotting of self-trapped waves in Nature

via @haggismaths (retweeting @eusci) on Twitter.