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My adventures in 3D printing: Prime number sieve

At work we’ve got a 3D printer. In this series of posts I’ll share some of the designs I’ve made.

Hand holding a stack of 3D printed squares, with holes cut out.

This is something I’ve wanted to make for a long time: a literal sieve of Eratosthenes.

This is a collection of trays which stack on top of each other.

Each tray has a grid of holes, with some holes filled in. The tray with a “2” on it has every second hole filled in; the tray with a “3” has every third hole filled in; and so on.

Four trays, corresponding to numbers 2,3,4 and 5

When the trays are stacked together, the holes you can see through correspond to prime numbers: every other number is filled in on one of the trays.

I went through quite a few iterations of this design. The first version was a series of nesting trays. After printing it, I realised that you might want to put the trays in a different order. After that, I did a lot of fiddling with different ways of making the plates stack on top of each other. The final version has sticky-outy pegs at each corner, and corresponding holes on the other side. I had to add a fair bit of margin around the holes so the wall didn’t go wiggly when printed.

You can download .scad and .stl files for the prime number sieve at Thingiverse.

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