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Domputer: the movie

If anyone remembers October 2012 (ahh, those were the days) you might recall we wrote about Aperiodipal Matt Parker, and his crazy project to build a computer out of dominoes. Well, it happened, but not much has happened since – sorting out a video of the event has taken a while. But it’s ready now! And it’s great!


John Conway on Numberphile!

Numberphile, the supremum over all YouTube channels, has scored a bit of a coup – Brady has sat down and recorded an interview with the famously Internet-reclusive John Conway.

In this first video (there’s a bonus one linked at the end of this one, and I hope there’ll be more) John talks about his love/hate relationship with his Game of Life.

[youtube url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8kUJL04ELA]

By the way, I notice from the video’s description that the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute is paying for Numberphile these days. Thanks, MSRI!

NT matters (Wrapping up algebraic numbers)

Aperiodipal Nathan Barker sent me this video by Durham University’s Herbert Gangl, inspired by his number theory course last year.

[youtube url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTFCPnxe9Jc]

I’ll never be able to think about algebraic numbers again without hearing this. Thanks, Herbert! No thanks, Nathan!

Yoshimoto Friends

Here’s a happy little film starring two Yoshimoto cubes, by Justin Lanier and Paul Salomon of Math Munch. Enjoy!

[youtube url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZi5FhAwFgI]

That Makes It Invertible! (by The Three Directions)

Put a smile on your face this Friday morning. Here, straight out of Harvey Mudd College, are the Three Directions performing their new smash hit, That Makes It Invertible!

[youtube url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4KCoNvRi6Y]

via MetaFilter

Amazing Sierpinski Tetrahedron

In the wake of a flurry of tetrices being constructed in schools all over the country (see this post about fractal Christmas tree worksheets, and this post featuring photos of completed trees), we’ve also been sent a video of a school group constructing an ambitious and impressive fractal structure, using envelopes cleverly folded into tetrahedra. The video is below, and features (eventually) a level 5 Sierpinski Tetrahedron, made from 1024 envelopes!

[youtube url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lYj5YcPAIg]

Via teacher Tim Dolan on Twitter.

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