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Integer Sequence Review Mêlée Hyper-Battle DX 2000 (Bracket 2)

Last week A002210, the decimal expansion of Khintchine’s constant, emerged victorious from Bracket 1. Now, get ready for round 2 of…

oeis review melee

Here are the rules: we’re judging each sequence on four axes: Aesthetics, Completeness, Explicability, and Novelty. We’re reviewing six sequences each week for four weeks, picking a winner from each. Then, we’ll pick one sequence from the ones we reviewed individually before this thing started, plus a wildcard. Finally, a single sequence will be crowned the Integest Sequence 2013! 

Integer Sequence Review Mêlée Hyper-Battle DX 2000 (Bracket 1)

After taking a couple of weeks off from reviewing integer sequences, we’ve decided to shake up the format. Prepare yourself for…

oeis review melee

We’re going to review six sequences each week for four weeks, picking a winner from each. Then, we’ll pick one sequence from the ones we’ve already reviewed individually, plus a wildcard. Finally, a single sequence will be crowned the Integest Sequence 2013!

We’re still judging each sequence on four axes: Aesthetics, Completeness, Explicability, and Novelty.

Without further ado, here we go!

Integer Sequence Review: A052486

The Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences contains over 200,000 sequences. It contains classics, curios, thousands of derivatives entered purely for completeness’s sake, short sequences whose completion would be a huge mathematical achievement, and some entries which are just downright silly.

For a lark, David and I have decided to review some of the Encyclopedia’s sequences. We’re rating sequences on four axes: NoveltyAestheticsExplicability and Completeness.

Following last week’s palaver, we’re going to do our best to be serious this time. Game faces on.

A052486
Achilles numbers – powerful but imperfect: writing n=product(p_i^e_i) then none of the e_i=1 (i.e. powerful(1)) but the highest common factor of the e_i>1 is 1 (so not perfect powers).

72, 108, 200, 288, 392, 432, 500, 648, 675, 800, 864, 968, 972, 1125, 1152, 1323, 1352, 1372, 1568, 1800, 1944, 2000, 2312, 2592, 2700, 2888, 3087, 3200, 3267, 3456, 3528, 3872, 3888, 4000, 4232, 4500, 4563, 4608, 5000, 5292, 5324, 5400, 5408, 5488, ...

Integer sequence review: A000959

The Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences contains over 200,000 sequences. It contains classics, curios, thousands of derivatives entered purely for completeness’s sake, short sequences whose completion would be a huge mathematical achievement, and some entries which are just downright silly.

For a lark, David and I have decided to review some of the Encyclopedia’s sequences. We’re rating sequences on four axes: NoveltyAestheticsExplicability and Completeness.

A000959
Lucky numbers.

1, 3, 7, 9, 13, 15, 21, 25, 31, 33, 37, 43, 49, 51, 63, 67, 69, 73, 75, 79, 87, 93, 99, 105, 111, 115, 127, 129, 133, 135, 141, 151, 159, 163, 169, 171, 189, 193, 195, 201, 205, 211, 219, 223, 231, 235, 237, 241, 259, 261, 267, 273, 283, 285, 289, 297, 303, ...

Integer sequence review: A005114

The Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences contains over 200,000 sequences. It contains classics, curios, thousands of derivatives entered purely for completeness’s sake, short sequences whose completion would be a huge mathematical achievement, and some entries which are just downright silly.

For a lark, David and I have decided to review some of the Encyclopedia’s sequences. We’re rating sequences on four axes: NoveltyAestheticsExplicability and Completeness.

Following last week’s palaver, we’re going to do our best to be serious this time. Game faces on. David promises there will actually be some maths in this sequence.

A005114
Untouchable numbers: impossible values for sum of aliquot parts of $n$.

2, 5, 52, 88, 96, 120, 124, 146, 162, 188, 206, 210, 216, 238, 246, 248, 262, 268, 276, 288, 290, 292, 304, 306, 322, 324, 326, 336, 342, 372, 406, 408, 426, 430, 448, 472, 474, 498, 516, 518, 520, 530, 540, 552, 556, 562, 576, 584, 612, 624, 626, 628, 658, ...

Integer sequence review: A051200

The Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences contains over 200,000 sequences. It contains classics, curios, thousands of derivatives entered purely for completeness’s sake, short sequences whose completion would be a huge mathematical achievement, and some entries which are just downright silly.

For a lark, David and I have decided to review some of the Encyclopedia’s sequences. We’ll be rating sequences on four axes: NoveltyAestheticsExplicability and Completeness.

A051200
Except for initial term, primes of form “n 3’s followed by 1”.

3, 31, 331, 3331, 33331, 333331, 3333331, 33333331, 333333333333333331, 3333333333333333333333333333333333333331, 33333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333331, ...
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