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Gowers needs you for an experiment concerning mathematical writing

Do you know about metric spaces? Would you like to be the subject of an experiment? Then Timothy Gowers needs you!

Gowers put a post on his weblog this morning containing five propositions to do with metric spaces, along with three write-ups of proofs of each proposition. He’s looking for feedback on how easy or hard to understand each write-up is, as well as how well-written they were.

If you’ve some time to spare, go and take part in the experiment over at Gowers’s weblog.

Carnival of Mathematics 87

The next issue of the Carnival of Mathematics, rounding up blog posts from the month of May, is now online at Random Walks.

The Carnival rounds up maths blog posts from all over the internet, including some from our own Aperiodical. For more information about the Carnival of Mathematics, click here.

Carnival of Mathematics 86

The next issue of the Carnival of Mathematics, rounding up blog posts from the month of April, is now online at The Math Less Travelled.

The Carnival rounds up maths blog posts from all over the internet, including some from our own Aperiodical. For more information about the Carnival of Mathematics, click here.

Slides about the princess in a castle puzzle

I gave a talk to our internal postgrad forum last week about the princess in a castle puzzle. I made some slides for it using deck.js. They looked quite nice and I could just about get what I wanted in them, but I now know that using SVG in HTML is still an enormous faff if you want it to scale nicely, which is basically the only reason you would use SVG.

Click here to see the slides.

I’m not sure if you can follow along with the slides without me talking; maybe I’ll do a transcript with slide drive later.

Continue reading “Slides about the princess in a castle puzzle” on cp’s mathem-o-blog

Words to Fill Space

For the April 2012 issue of Puzzlebomb, I devised Hilbert’s Space-Filling Crossword:

Hilbert's Space Filling Crossword

The five clues lead to four four-letter words along the rows of the grid, and one sixteen-letter word snaking round the shape given by the thick lines. The puzzle gets its name from the shape traced out by the long word, which is the second iteration of Hilbert’s space-filling curve.

MacMahon Squares

In my capacity as someone who occasionally turns up and does maths at people, I often find myself exposed to ‘starter puzzles’ – things the organisers provide to whichever group of humans have come to see me do maths, to give them something to do in any waiting time before the event starts. This is, of course, a fantastic source of ideas for the MathsJam I run in Manchester, as well as just being great for me as I get to have a go at them all.

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