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Bread & Kisses

bread and kisses

Bread & Kisses is a short film by Katherine Fitzgerald about a mathematician who discovers love – I know, I know, you’ve heard this one before – but it also contains a mathematician who moves to the Alps to get more skiing in, so it’s the most realistic film about mathematicians ever. It also features the emotion of love in a star turn as an epsilon term.

Although it contains the line, “you forgot the most important ingredient: love”, so don’t get your hopes too high.

Interesting π Esoterica

My way of celebrating π day is to rummage through my trove of obscure writings and dig up some interesting esoterica on the subject of that constant. Here’s what I found.

In case you’re new to this: every now and then I encounter a paper or a book or an article that grabs my interest but isn’t directly useful for anything. It might be about some niche sub-sub-subtopic I’ve never heard of, or it might talk about something old from a new angle, or it might just have a funny title. I put these things in my Interesting Esoterica collection on Mendeley. And then when I’ve gathered up enough, I collect them here.

Pi Day on Twitter

We can’t hope to keep up with all the π action around the internet today, so here’s a live stream of #piday tweets.


I bought three.onefouronefivenine.com

threeonefouronefivenine

I’m a big fan of novelty domain names: I once bought hotmathematicians.com just so that christian@hotmathematicians.com could be my corresponding address when I submitted a paper. That domain has expired, but my love for one-shot novelty purchases has not!

To celebrate π day this year, I decided that it should be possible to type a little bit of π into the internet and be given the rest of it. You can have dots in domain names, so a domain like “three.something.com” is possible. I only know π to two decimal places off the top of my head, so I was dismayed to learn that onefour.com is being squatted.

After a bit of googling to find more digits of π (hey, this website will be really useful once I set it up!), I found the first decimal approximation which hasn’t already been registered:

three.onefouronefivenine.com

Try going there now. It really exists!

I’ve set it up so you get an endlessly scrolling list of decimal digits of π, generated using my favourite unbounded spigot algorithm. I suppose you can consider this my entry in our π approximation challenge.

A good π day’s work.

Matt Parker approximates π by weighing a circle

Stand-up mathematician Matt Parker has accepted our π approximation challenge. His method involves weighing a large cardboard circle.

So, how did that go? Fortunately, Matt got it all on video:

I think he deserves a round of applause for doing all that long division.