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Apéryodical takeover: It’s Roger Apéry’s 100th birthday!

aperyhat

Today is the 100th anniversary of Roger Apéry’s birth, and we’re The Aperiodical, so we just had to make a big deal of it.

So, for all of today, we’re The Apéryodical. Throughout today we’ve got a few posts about Apéry and the thing he’s most closely associated with: the Riemann zeta function.

For now, here’s a really big ζ. You’ll need it later.

ζ

Not Mentioned on the Aperiodical, 10th November 2016

Here’s a round-up of some of the news from this month.

Never-ending Turing centenary, part XLVI

The Alan Turing centenary shows no signs of abating.

First of all, there’s a marvellous new art installation under Paddington Bridge in London, in memory of Turing. There’s also a theatre piece called Breaking the Code, showing at Manchester’s Royal Exchange Theatre until 19th November.

Secondly, work continues to introduce legislation in the UK pardoning all gay men who were convicted of crimes related to homosexuality, in the same way Alan was a few years ago. Ministers said they were ‘committed’ to getting the law passed, but in an emotional session the bill was “talked out” by minister Sam Gyimah, meaning it wasn’t voted on.

LMS wins the first Royal Society Athena prize

The London Mathematical Society (LMS) has been honoured this autumn by receiving the first Royal Society Athena Prize to recognise its advancement of diversity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) within the mathematical community. The prize was awarded in a ceremony at the Royal Society’s annual diversity conference on 31 October.

Royal Society press release

Fourth Christopher Zeeman medal goes to Rob Eastaway

Mathematician, author and friend of the site Rob Eastaway has received the 2016 Christopher Zeeman medal, awarded to recognise and acknowledge the contributions of mathematicians involved in promoting mathematics to the public and engaging with the public in mathematics in the UK.

There will be an award lecture taking place on 22 March 2017, and details will be announced in Mathematics Today and the LMS Newsletter.

IMA website article on the award
Rob Eastaway’s citation (PDF)

The magic number 25641

Reader of the site Bhaskar Hari Phadke has written in to tell us this fun fact about the number $25641$. It’s easier to show than to describe, so here goes:

\begin{align}
25641 \times \color{blue}{1} \times 4 &= \color{blue}{1}02564 \\
25641 \times \color{blue}{2} \times 4 &= \color{blue}{2}05128 \\
25641 \times \color{blue}{3} \times 4 &= \color{blue}{3}07692 \\
25641 \times \color{blue}{4} \times 4 &= \color{blue}{4}10256 \\
25641 \times \color{blue}{5} \times 4 &= \color{blue}{5}12820 \\
25641 \times \color{blue}{6} \times 4 &= \color{blue}{6}15384 \\
25641 \times \color{blue}{7} \times 4 &= \color{blue}{7}17948 \\
25641 \times \color{blue}{8} \times 4 &= \color{blue}{8}20512 \\
25641 \times \color{blue}{9} \times 4 &= \color{blue}{9}23076
\end{align}

A good one to challenge a young person with.

I did a little bit of Sloanewhacking and found a couple of sequences containing $25641$ which almost, but don’t quite, describe this property. So, semi-spoiler warning: you might enjoy A256005 and A218857. I’d like to come up with the ‘magic number’ which looks the least like it’ll have this property – any ideas?

Thanks, Bhaskar!

“π – It’s Complicated” – a talk I gave on Pi Day 2016 at Ustinov College Café Scientifique

I was invited to give a talk for Ustinov College’s Café Scientifique on π Day this year. The turnout wasn’t great and I put quite a bit of effort into the slides, so I wanted to put it online. I’ve finally got hold of the recording, so here it is. Unfortunately they didn’t set the camera’s exposure properly, making the screen illegible, so you’ll probably want to follow along with the slides in another window.

I tried to come up with a way of writing today’s date as a multiple of π Day, but couldn’t make it work. However, I did realise that Halloween (31/10) is the best approximation to π between now and the next π day (I think). Sπooky!

The world’s smallest Rubik’s cube is 5.6mm wide and absolutely adorable

I just found this video of a very focused man showing off a teeny tiny Rubik’s cube. It’s 5.6mm on each side, which apparently makes it the smallest in the world, beating some relatively gigantesque efforts of 6mm and larger.

Watch this video; I’ll warn you now that the squee factor gives way to some very dry detail quite quickly.

The cube was made by Tony Fisher, by filing down a 3D-printed 6mm cube. I hadn’t heard of Tony before, which surprises me – his site is full of all sorts of incredible twisty puzzles.