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3.142: a π round-up

Pi pie by Robert Couse-Baker. Photo used under the CC-BY 2.0 license.

π pie by Robert Couse-Baker. Photo used under the CC-BY 2.0 licence.

‘Tis the season to celebrate the circle constant!1 Yes, that’s right: in some calendar systems using some date notation, the day and month coincide with the first three digits of π, and mathematicians all over the world are celebrating with thematic baked goods and the wearing of irrational t-shirts.

And the internet’s maths cohort isn’t far behind. Here’s a round-up (geddit – round?!) of some of our favourites. In case you were wondering, we at The Aperiodical hadn’t forgotten about π day – we’re just saving ourselves for next year, when we’ll celebrate the magnificent “3.14.15”, which will for once be more accurate to the value of π than π approximation day on 22/7. (Admittedly, for the last few years, 3.14.14 and so on have strictly been closer to π than 22/7. But this will be the first time you can include the year and feel like you’re doing it right.)

  1. Pedants would have me revise that to “circle constant”. []

John Conway on Numberphile!

Numberphile, the supremum over all YouTube channels, has scored a bit of a coup – Brady has sat down and recorded an interview with the famously Internet-reclusive John Conway.

In this first video (there’s a bonus one linked at the end of this one, and I hope there’ll be more) John talks about his love/hate relationship with his Game of Life.

[youtube url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8kUJL04ELA]

By the way, I notice from the video’s description that the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute is paying for Numberphile these days. Thanks, MSRI!

An infinite series of blog posts which sums to -1/12

Many of you who are aware of the internet will have noticed that some mild controversy has surrounded a recent Numberphile video, posted last week:

[youtube url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-I6XTVZXww]

Translate Numberphile, please / Traduisez Numberphile, s’il-vous-plaît / Bitte übersetzen Numberphile…

Numberphile is that cool YouTube channel with the videos about the numbers and the philes. You might remember them from the time they did that ace video about our integer sequence reviews. But if you’re unlucky enough not to understand the English as she is spoke, then that’s no use to you.

But it could be! Chief Numberphile Brady Haran has set up a page asking for translations of the videos, so everyone can enjoy them. As long as you’re fluent in one of the languages for which a video already has subtitles, the process is pretty simple: you download a caption file in one language, translate it into another, and upload it back to the site. And then you’ve done a good deed!

Brady’s just posted on Twitter that he’s already approved 24 translations since starting the project yesterday evening, so join your fellow Frenchmen/Flemings/Faroese and get translating. (I suggest you start with “Six Sequences”…)

Submit a translation: Translations for Numberphile at subtitl.us

via Brady Haran on Twitter

Integer sequence reviews on Numberphile (or vice versa)

There’s no new integer sequence review this week, because David and I are taking a break before the Grand Finale Ultimate Showdown of Dreams next week. To tide you over, top chap Brady Haran has recorded a Numberphile video with Tony Padilla explaining each of the six sequences in the final in his Enthusiastic Maths Outreach™ voice.

If you haven’t made your mind up yet, maybe the video will sway you. Or will it sow doubt into your previously made-up mind???!?!?!?!!?!?! Anyway, it’s a very good video.

[youtube url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VDD6FDhKCYA]

The Integest Sequence 2013 will be announced next week in a glitzy celebrity gala event. There’s still time to vote for your favourite sequence, and there’s still time for us to decide how much attention we’ll pay to your vote. Everything’s still to play for!

Links

Integest Sequence 2013 Public Vote

Numberphile

Dr Tony Padilla

Ipso Post Facto Navigato

Rubik’s Tube

James Grime, cubing hard

Numberphile filmmaker and general internet legend Brady Haran has been busy putting together a series of YouTube videos about the Rubik’s cube, with contributions from Aperiodical friends Matt Parker and James Grime. The videos also feature lots of solving clips sent in by viewers, and Aperiodical Editor triumvir and sometime maths-talker-abouter Katie Steckles (that’s me) occasionally pops in to make comments and state facts which are no longer true (a world record was broken 4 days after filming).

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